Fidelity Fund Data and Rates Tables

Click on the name of the Fidelity fund data that you wish to view. Information will be posted in January and February of as data becomes available.

  • Federal Municipal Funds and Securities
    Federal municipal funds that are exempt from federal income taxes

    Although certain federal municipal funds' interest dividends generally are not subject to federal income tax, shareholders are required to report them on their federal income tax returns, and a portion of them may be subject to the federal alternative minimum tax. We report these amounts to applicable shareholders and to the Internal Revenue Service as exempt-interest dividends in Box 11 of Form 1099-DIV and are required to report the portion of that tax-exempt interest that may be subject to the federal AMT as specified private activity bond interest on Box 12 of Form 1099-DIV.

    Although state tax laws differ, most states do not tax interest on municipal bonds issued by their own state, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, or Guam. Therefore, if you are required to report interest income on your state tax return, you may be able to exclude the interest you received from municipal issues in your home state and (unless the laws of your state require otherwise) from municipal issues in Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and Guam. The table shows the interest earned from the obligations of each state and territory as a percentage of the total interest income earned by each fund during . The amount of municipal bond interest from your state, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and Guam can be calculated by multiplying the total interest dividend you received from a fund (reported as tax-exempt interest on Form 1099-DIV) by the appropriate percentage of interest received from your state, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and Guam (reported on the accompanying Fidelity Federal Municipal Funds Interest Dividends By State table). If shareholders received a taxable gain distribution, that information is reported on Form 1099-DIV as well.

    Mutual funds that hold U.S. Government securities

    In all 50 states and the District of Columbia, income earned from U.S. government securities held by individuals should be exempt from state personal income tax. Many states provide for this tax-exemption to be "passed through" to shareholders of mutual funds that hold these securities.

    To determine the portion of dividends that may be exempt from state income tax or investment tax, multiply the 'Total Ordinary Dividends' amount for each applicable fund reported in Box 1a of Form 1099-DIV by the percentage listed in the table.

    California, Connecticut, and New York exempt dividend income only when a mutual fund has met a certain minimum investment in U.S. Government securities. Funds marked with an asterisk (*) did not meet the minimum investment in U.S. Government securities required to exempt the distribution from tax in California, Connecticut, and New York. State tax returns will contain specific instructions for reporting dividends.

  • State Municipal Funds
    State municipal funds that have interest income derived in part from out-of-state obligations

    Certain state-specific municipal funds have interest income derived in part from out-of-state obligations. All of the interest dividends that these funds paid were exempt from federal income tax. In addition, for residents of the applicable state, most of each fund's interest income was exempt from state and certain local income taxes.

    Although these funds' interest dividends generally are not subject to federal income tax, shareholders are required to report them on their federal income tax return, and a portion of these dividends may be subject to the federal alternative minimum tax.

    Fidelity reports to the IRS and applicable shareholders on Form 1099-DIV exempt-interest dividends distributed from mutual funds. If shareholders received a taxable capital gain distribution, that information is also reported on Form 1099-DIV.

    State municipal funds that have interest income derived only from in-state obligations

    Certain state-specific municipal funds derived interest income only from in-state obligations. For residents of the applicable state, all of the interest dividends that these funds paid should be exempt from federal, state, and certain local income taxes.

    Although these funds' interest dividends generally are not subject to federal income tax, shareholders are required to report these dividends on a federal tax return, and a portion of these dividends may be subject to the federal alternative minimum tax.

    Fidelity reports to the IRS and applicable shareholders on Form 1099-DIV exempt-interest dividends distributed from mutual funds. Taxable capital gain distributions are also reported on Form 1099-DIV.

    State municipal funds subject to the Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT)

    Income generated by certain holdings in municipal funds is subject to the federal alternative minimum tax (AMT).

    Fidelity reports exempt interest dividends and the portion of such dividends subject to the federal AMT on Form 1099-DIV. For shareholders who are exempt recipients for tax reporting purposes and do not receive a Form 1099-DIV, they can use the table to the left to calculate the amount of income they received from Fidelity municipal funds that should be subject to the federal AMT.

  • Funds with Capital Gains or Dividends
    Funds with distributions in
    Funds with reclassified distributions

    Funds can declare and pay different types of distributions, including ordinary dividends, qualified dividends, short-term capital gain distributions, and long-term capital gain distributions. One less common distribution type is called Unrecaptured Section 1250 Gains, which are gains from certain depreciable real property. Funds estimate what their distributions are at the time they declare and pay them.

    As part of a fund's normal fiscal year-end accounting procedures, and to comply with various tax laws and regulations, the distributions previously estimated for each category need to be reconciled against the fund's actual net income. Sometimes adjustments are necessary, and such adjustments may require that some or all of the previously issued distributions be reclassified. The total amount of the distribution should not change; only how the distribution is classified should change.

    Ordinary dividends that may be taxed at long-term capital gain tax rates instead of the higher ordinary income tax rates

    A percentage of dividends and short-term capital gain distributions from certain Fidelity Advisor funds are potentially eligible to be treated as qualified dividends and taxed at long-term capital gain tax rates instead of the higher ordinary income tax rates. To use the long-term capital gains tax rates for this percentage of dividends and short-term capital gains distributions, individual taxpayers must have met the requisite holding period on their applicable shares. For shareholders who receive a Form 1099-DIV, qualified dividends are reported in Box 1b.

    Ordinary dividends that may be eligible for the 20% qualified business income deduction

    A percentage of dividends and short-term capital gain distributions from certain Fidelity Advisor funds are potentially eligible to be treated as section 199A dividends and thus as eligible for the 20% qualified business income deduction. These amounts are attributable to qualified real estate investment trust (REIT) dividends received by the fund. An individual taxpayer can only take a 20% deduction for this percentage of dividends and short-term capital gains distributions to the extent that he or she met the requisite holding period requirements on his/her applicable fund shares. For shareholders who receive a Form 1099-DIV, section 199A dividends are reported in Box 5.

    Funds with distributions that exceeded their net income

    When a fund's distributions exceed its net income, the excess is considered a "return of capital." A return of capital can occur if a fund that pays monthly or quarterly dividends determines that its income for tax purposes is less than the amount it has already distributed. In such cases the fund's net income for the year may be less than the dividends paid to shareholders.

    The portion of dividends distributed to shareholders in excess of the fund's earned income is usually considered nontaxable to shareholders and results in a corresponding decrease in the basis of the shareholder's shares. Return of capital distributions are reinvested or distributed in cash based on the elections a shareholder has made on his or her account. For shareholders who receive a Form 1099-DIV, return of capital distributions are reported as non-dividend distribution in Box 3.

  • Foreign Source Income
    Fidelity Funds that hold foreign securities

    Foreign governments may withhold income tax on the dividends, interest, and gains earned on U.S. investments in foreign securities. The amounts withheld are determined by the laws of the countries in which the foreign investments are made and by the tax treaties that those countries have with the United States.

    If a foreign country requires that a fund pay taxes, the fund must reduce the dividend income passed to shareholders by the amount of the taxes paid. However, a mutual fund that holds more than 50% of its assets in foreign securities at year end may elect to permit shareholders to claim a credit or deduction on their income tax returns for their pro rata portion of certain foreign taxes paid by the fund. If the election is made, the taxable dividends reported by the fund as having been paid to shareholders for tax reporting purposes are not reduced for foreign taxes paid. Rather, a percentage of each shareholder's dividend income as reported for tax reporting purposes would equal his or her share of taxes paid. A shareholder may then be able to claim that amount as a deduction or a credit (depending on the shareholder's individual circumstances) on his or her tax return.

    Keep in mind that foreign tax paid and nonresident alien (NRA) withholding are unrelated.

  • Taxpayers in Specific States

    Taxpayers subject to tax in these states may be either exempt from paying state income tax or eligible for a reduced income tax rate on the distributions, dividends, and/or capital gains of certain funds.

    The relevant distribution amounts are reported by fund on IRS Form 1099-DIV.

  • Corporate Investors

    A portion of the dividends received may qualify for the dividends-received deduction available to corporate shareholders for calendar year . The amounts that qualify for the corporate dividends-received deduction may differ from amounts reported to individuals as qualified dividends, as a result of certain provisions of the Jobs and Growth Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2003.

  • Foreign Investors (NRA Shareholders)

    A shareholder who is not a citizen or resident of the United States or entity organized outside the U.S. (an "NRA Shareholder") is exempt from U.S. federal income tax on any "interest-related dividends" or "short-term capital gain-related dividends" declared by a U.S. mutual fund.

    NRA shareholders may be entitled to claim a refund from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) for the amount of U.S. federal income tax withheld from their mutual fund distributions that is attributable to "interest-related dividends" or "short-term capital gain-related dividends" by filing IRS Form 1040-NR.

    The total U.S. federal income tax withheld during from your Fidelity account is indicated on Form 1042-S.

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